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creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> chris: colonel mcsally, those are the two basic arguments. you are a combat pilot but you are not formally, not in combat on the front lines, you are attached to combat units and the two arguments are, one, physical limitations, particularly to serving in the infantry and also the question of a distraction during operations, when you are in close quarters, there is no privacy and rugged living conditions and look in your camera and tell general boykin why he's wrong. >> let me just say i realize flying combat aircraft and being on the ground in combat are two very different missions, hover the same flawed arguments were used against allowing women to fly in combat and now allowing them to be on ground combat. like the general said these are flawed arguments the battle line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight. which includes physical strength, plus courage, plus aptitude and leadership and, all the other things we need to have the mo
distracters there which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders and actually creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> chris: colonel mcsally those are the two basic arguments. you are a combat pilot but normally you are not in combat on the frontlines. you are attached to combat units and the two arguments are one, physical limitations, particularly to serving in the infantry and also this question of a distraction during operations when you are in close quarters there is no privacy and rugged living conditions. look in your camera and tell general boykin why he is wrong? >> let me just say that i realize that flying combat aircraft and bying on the ground in combat are two very different missions. the same flawed arguments were used against allowing women to fly in combat and now allowing women to be in ground combat like general boykin has said. these are flawed arguments. the bottom line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight which includes physical strength plus courag
for authority and put you into an environment where those things are not held in regard and i was ridiculed. i was harassed, teachers pet, talking like a white boy, all these things are not made. the irony was the only reason it didn't taste too likely kids at the school took a liking to me and defended me they are much bigger than anyone else. i might've been held back a couple grades. but it is going through that experience and realizing there was all this animosity when it came to not just race, but the whole archetype of what it meant to be black. i talk about what it means to be authentically like in someone who believes in the dignity and work of every individual and how that individual was named in the image of god, i take exception that there's a standard that says this is what it means to be black and anyone who doesn't fit in to this box can possibly be black. jesse jackson a couple years ago saying you can't be against the president's health care plan and call yourself black. why not? last time i looked in the mirror i qualified. so the whole experience i had an outlet near with a c
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> with temperatures in washington hovering in the 20s, what may be the last surviving housefly of the winter season was hovering in the white house today, and had an encounter with the president during a press event. >> that's why today i am nominating mary jo white to lead the security and exchange commission, and richard cordray to continue leading the consumer financial protection bureau. this guy is bothering me here. >> the incident left us with this unfortunate still photo of the president. and while we presume secret service wrestled the offender to the ground, the president has a history with flies, famously dispatching one during an interview with our own john harwood. >>> the roar that could be heard for miles today around huntsville, alabama was the test-firing of a vintage rocket
the atmosphere here. environment experts believe lawmakers are taking the situation seriously. >> there is a political ownership of that change. the government is certainly more responsive, but in terms of action, and implementation is a problem and there is a lot of slack, even now. >> whenever the experts say, it is people with breathing problems to suffer the most. this man has had asthma all his life and his condition gets worse. >> we cannot inhale that. we're not comfortable breathing that air. i usually go to the park in the morning but i don't feel like it when there is smog. >> local authorities are planning to place electric signboards to warn drivers about pollution and encourage them to keep their cars at home. activists say it's a start but what they want to see is a better public transport policy and a secure cycling lane it to encourage drivers to leave their cars at home and keep pollution and smog at bay. >> the president of venezuela remained in cuba where he has been treated for cancer. a spokesman says he's overcome a respiratory infection and is still poli
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
/win environment. certain states in the u.s. are doing a good job. those models whether they occur in canada, colorado, uk or israel or russia is what we're looking for. >> just to put this in some perspective for you. that company, cisco, has nearly $40 billion parked overseas, not here in the u.s. and chambers is pretty clear telling me he's not going to be investing a lot of that money in the united states unless policy changes here. so, two very different arguments but the same goal and the same conversation here all week. job creation. and i think the consensus here is that people really want clarity from washington on taxes and on spending. they want to see a long term deal. miguel? >> thank you, poppy harlow. 40 billion bucks, a lot. >>> if you're still on a high from the golden globes, brace yourself. hollywood is set for another round of it. the 19th annual screen actor guild awards are tonight honoring the best actors and actresses in tv and film. nischelle turner has more. >> reporter: in the hollywood honors where oscar's granddaddy, you might call the sag awards a sassy teenager
with a polarized environment? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer, if part of the answer is the following, when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955 the senate was and has been for decades, let's put it that way, same mess, hard to believe, the same dysfunctional mess and it is today. bills couldn't get past. the power in front of the president wasn't a party, republicans against democrats, half of the democrats in the senate, southern democrats who were just as conservative as can be imagined on civil rights and everything else and in that year, 1965 if i have the number right, 16 great standing committees of the senate, republicans were chairman of nine of them and senior committee post was stacked with them. they stopped every president because no one seems to realize it. and when they realize the midwestern republicans were on the same side, and anyone got a major domestic bill through congress. and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity, he -- majority leader for six years. instantly the senate is back in the same m
through. it was not a matter of their qualifications so much as the environment in which they were placed, which is not of their doing. their chain of command did not of of going through all of the level steps. they went to the wing commander. that is not something they did, that was something externally placed. that is my concern. the people in the periphery that want to see certain amounts, certain numbers of women in certain jobs, they may or may not be qualified. if they are not, they should not be in the job. i am concerned that somebody will say, they have to be in the job because our program, the inclusion of women demands it. then you start eroding or chipping away at the qualification issue. that, to be quite honest, is my biggest concern. not with the women can do. not what they are qualified to do. what people outside of the program thing should be done. host: i want to make sure i understand. when these women first came through as a pilot trainees, they had a different chain of command than their male trainee counterplots? caller: it was not anything written down on paper. if
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
there aren't frontlines, and there are urban environments. she lived with other american soldiers. she lived in this same very dirty room that smelled of feet almost all the time. they got along very well. i can imagine if you multiply that throughout what they call theater of battle and you have women in these tiny frontline outposts across the country that it would be a major adjustment. they will be logistical things that they'll have to adjust to. not just latrines, but they'll have to have more sensitivity training because these outposts are very macho, very aggress he have kinds of places. it will be a big adjustments. >> but it's an adjustment that the women all welcome. there is a lot of support for this on capitol hill from both republicans and democrats because they all have constituents, and they all see that these women are blocked. they're barred from promotions, and they're suffering all of the trevail of combat or being in a war zone without having the benefits. >> and without having certain, as you say, career advancement. there is some pay implications as well. what i just w
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
for taking a stand. some of the relatively freer environment, they're able to create conditions for the modern is that. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. who were the people who most of those things? was a king, mathematics, and death of avarice, stokely carmichael? >> guest: all of them had different roles in the movement pier one at the ways in which i tried to explain to students is rosa parks made the cooking possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she had done what she did for refusing to give up her seat on that last, martin luther king would've simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that were talking about him today. she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had been to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said russia was sitting on the best refusing to give up her seat, she was thinking about emmett till, the 14th of black way from chicago who went to mississippi in 1855 and because he was a better way women, was brutally murdered. to think his d
wages or in a way that could get a better working environment, then it's okay. if you're not, saying your bored is going to cause some problems. >> especially if you're bored being on twitter and facebook. it depends on the category. the board upheld the filing of a reporter for the arizona daily star who was bored and posted online saying what? no overnight homicide? you're slacking, tucson. well, that was considered not acceptable for his employer at the newspaper. >> bad taste might be a problem. but what about how are companies handling this? are they being forced to expand their policies? i mean how broad does it need to be? >> the n.l.r.b. is actually urging or pushing companies to rewrite their policies so that they're in line with their new series of recommendations. so they're trying to get the cost-cos of the world and other large companies... >> target and general motors among those. >> ... to do it. wal-mart gets an a-plus because wal-mart already rewrote its policies to be more in line with what the n.l.r.b. is say joog what the chairman of the n.l.r.b. is saying is that
, to that helps to set the environment, i think, but there's still a lot of work to do. the president admits that as we get closer to a resolution or an actual law, that it's going to be tougher. there will be a lot of sack feeses made there. we still need the public to be engaged, and that's why he went out directly to las vegas where the support was overwhelming for him, for many progressives who were thinking about immigration reform, and i think it was a good way of telling the latino community and all the other immigrant groups that right now are faced with problems and immigration because it's a broken system, that, hey, we're going to get this done. we're going to get it done if n a timely fashion. >> we see marco rubio joining these senators, but others have -- ted cruz, rush limbaugh and others have taken strong positions against the proposals. how long is the president going to give the senate and the house to try to work this out before he will come forth with his own proposals? sfwli think he said he is looking anywhere from maybe four to five months and he has to work its way th
of this little country of israel to exist in such a hostile environment. as well as all of the problems that senator hagel has with regard, really, to the global leadership of the united states. i think it's -- he could not have picked a more troublesome, out of the mainstream nominee and i'm not alone. "the washington post" in an editorial early this year begged the president not to choose senator hagel as being totally out of the mainstream. >> senator wicker, thank you for your time. i greatly appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> let's bring in nia-malika henderson, jim rootenberg and jack jacobs. jim, i would like to start off with you. you were on yesterday and discussing an article you'd written discussing who's behind the television ads and radio ads who have gone after chuck hagel on israel, on his comments that were seen as anti-gay. the list goes on and on here but we know it's coming from secret donors. this factor in to the questions that we heard today from the senators? >> i don't -- you know, i have to say to me this is the real stuff and these are obviously lawmakers putting
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
with republicans about spending cuts, um, in a very bad environment with consumer demand going downward. that is not an environment for him to score wins with. jon: and 7.8% unemployment and his jobs council is going away, but the president has four more years. we'll continue to watch it. a.b. stoddard from "the hill," thank you. >> thank you. jenna: well, a frightening standoff right now in alabama where a 5-year-old boy is being held hostage in a bizarre underground bunker by a suspected killer. former nypd hostage negotiator on the delicate task that is really facing police right now. what do you do in this situation? we'll talk about it with an expert coming up. plus, seeing is believing, where a massive twister tore through a town smashing homes and killing at least one perp. rick reichmuth on where this violent storm is moving now. >> get over here. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! cue up alka-seltzer. it s
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kimjong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're s
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
to that environment. i have to believe that the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. host: from yesterday's news conference at the pentagon, and our entire programming is on c- span.org -- we welcome our radio listeners as well. there was this from robert -- this was based on the clip we just showed you, from the army officer from the marine corps. we will go to robert from north carolina, a democrat. caller: i am a combat veteran of korea and vietnam. i will cut it short. they were talking about the all volunteer army. there were trying to get women into the ranks. my sister -- [indiscernible] one thing i found out, what we went through in vietnam and korea, it was for men and went -- and men only. yes, they served in different areas such as the medical field, but in combat, no. host: ok, thank you for the call. the story inside the new york times -- there are similar stories around the country. -- a couple of points -- back to your calls. jesse in muskegon, michigan. good morning. caller: good morning. can you hear me? host: yes. caller: i have a
environments. it's coral reefs and they are disappearing far too quickly around the world. >> thank you. also, stick around to check out this. this is amazing. i want to show the viewers. these are birds. starlings to be exact. they are flying synchronized here. it looks like dark clouds. this is over israel. we understand they do this to find food and also to be a defense against birds of prey so they appear to be one big mass. have you ever seen anything like it? >> i have never seen anything like this with this species of birds n. the ocean, fish swarm in similar ways. it is an effective defense that confuses birds, animals. it can confuse a predator. if nothing else, it's so beautiful, isn't it? a reminder of the wonder of nature. how graflt we should be that there are still sights like this left in the world. >> it is beautiful. it reminds me of hitchcock's "the birds," too. there are two sides to it. just saying. >> indeed. that's in the back of one's mind. >> thanks. good to see you. >>> imagine this -- living in smog that's so thick you would be willing to pay money for a lung full of
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
that let you do what you do and, live in this environment. bill: there he is. speaking like an american, huh? like that. mickelson's net worth is $180 million. the guy ain't hurting but tiger woods says mickelson was right about taxes especially in california and says high taxes was why woods moved out of the california and moved to florida with no state income tax in the first place. both of these guys are from california. mickelson made his hometown there for, he was born and raised in san diego. for him to leave the state is a big, big deal. if you're taking home 37 cents on the dollar, 47 cents on the dollar, i think it is okay to speak up. martha: it is something for all americans to give some thought to. bill: why did he apologize? martha: i don't know why he apologized, the backlash against it, saying is it right for any american to spend 63 cents of their dollar, of every dollar they make and hand it over to the government? bill: state, county, federal. martha: so much discussion about fair share and people, people obviously, some people are outraged. he can afford it. that is n
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
, just real quickly. the environment has changed since 2007. that is why we are guardedly optimistic. there are a whole bunch of minds out there that we have to avoid or defuse but i'm confident and cautiously optimistic we can get this done. if we don't think i think it's going to have from of haitians not just for republicans but for the entire country. do have a nation with 11 million people living in the shadows is not a country we like to teach our country about. spoony something that you shared that you both came from from the house. what is the path in getting to the house? passing a measure? >> i think probably one of the scenarios is a majority of the democrats in the house and a significant and maybe a majority of the republicans in the house. i would not anticipate a unanimous republican support but i think there can be significant republican support. >> the point it would make a larger number of republicans begin the senate the more like in my judgment as we will pass it in the house and second going through the committee and allowing amendments and goings to the floor an
? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regulatory issues, collect a lot of information on the future of energy, where it's headed in the u.s. and globally. and we tried to use the information to help steer toyota's advanced development. guest: one of the high points is greenhouse gases and fuel economy for our vehicles. the auto industry has signed up for some fairly aggressive standards that will take us to the 2025 model year. they are aggressive standards. consumers will have to embrace the technologies we're trying to get out there. host: what does that really mean? guest: the target is 54 miles per hour by 2025. we have a lot of work to do. our strategy is are hybrid strategy. toyota had 16% of our new vehicle fleet were hybrid vehicles. the industry itself is that 3%. we intend to maintain that leadership. host: that means you have to do with the future of what
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)